Static RAM and Dynamic RAM Comparison

RAM (Random Access Memory) is an important component in a computer that functions as a temporary storage area for data and instructions that are being used by the CPU (Central Processing Unit). There are two types of RAM that are most commonly used: Static RAM (SRAM) and Dynamic RAM (DRAM).

In this article, we will discuss the differences between SRAM and DRAM, the advantages and disadvantages of each type of RAM, and how SRAM and DRAM work.

Static RAM and Dynamic RAM Comparison


Static RAM (SRAM)

SRAM is a type of RAM that uses flip-flops to store data. A flip-flop is a digital logic circuit that can maintain its state (0 or 1) even without signal input. Therefore, SRAM can store data without the need for continuous refresh.

Advantages of SRAM

One of the advantages of SRAM is its high speed. Because data can be accessed directly without waiting for it to be refreshed, SRAM has very fast access times, even faster than DRAM. SRAM also has the ability to read and write data simultaneously, which is known as dual-porting. This allows SRAM to be used in applications that require access to multiple data locations simultaneously.

Disadvantages of SRAM

The main drawback of SRAM is that it is more expensive than DRAM. In addition, SRAM has a lower data density than DRAM, meaning it requires more space to store the same data.



Dynamic RAM (DRAM)

DRAM is a type of RAM that uses capacitors to store data. The capacitor is an electronic component that can store electric charge. Each data bit in DRAM is stored in a capacitor. However, capacitors have the disadvantage that their charge will be lost after some time. Therefore, the data in DRAM must be refreshed regularly to keep its load intact.

Advantages of DRAM

The main advantage of DRAM is that it is cheaper than SRAM. In addition, DRAM has a higher data density, meaning it can store more data in a smaller space than SRAM.

Disadvantages of DRAM

The main drawback of DRAM is that it is slower than SRAM. Because data must be refreshed regularly, DRAM has a slower access time than SRAM. Additionally, DRAM can only read or write data to one location at a time, which is known as single-ported. This limits the use of DRAM in applications that require access to multiple data locations simultaneously.



The difference between Static RAM and Dynamic RAM

There are several key differences between SRAM and DRAM:

FeatureSRAMDRAM
Method of StorageStores data as a latch using flip-flops.Stores data as a charge on a capacitor.
RefreshingDoes not require refreshing.Requires refreshing to prevent data loss.
SpeedFaster than DRAM due to no refreshing and simpler circuitry.Slower than SRAM due to refreshing and more complex circuitry.
DensityLower density due to larger cells.Higher density due to smaller cells.
Power ConsumptionConsumes more power due to higher voltage and more transistors.Consumes less power due to lower voltage and fewer transistors.
CostMore expensive due to simpler circuitry and lower density.Less expensive due to complex circuitry and higher density.


How Static RAM and Dynamic RAM Work

SRAM and DRAM work in different ways. SRAM uses flip-flops that can maintain their state without a signal input, whereas DRAM uses capacitors that require a regular refresh to maintain charge.

When the CPU requires data or instructions from RAM, a request signal will be sent to RAM. Then, RAM will retrieve data from memory and send it to the CPU.

In SRAM, when the CPU needs data, the flip-flop will fetch data from memory and store it. Data can be accessed directly from the flip-flop, so it has a very fast access time. When the CPU wants to write data to RAM, the flip-flop will be activated and the data will be stored in memory.

Read more : Memory Functions


In DRAM, when the CPU needs data, the capacitors fetch data from memory and store it. However, because capacitors have the disadvantage of losing their charge over time, the data must be refreshed regularly to maintain the charge. When the CPU wants to write data to RAM, the capacitor will be activated and the data will be stored in memory.

The choice Between SRAM and DRAM depends on the specific requirements of the system. If the system requires fast data access and low data density, SRAM can be a good choice. However, if the system requires high data density at a lower cost, DRAM may be a better choice.

Apart from that, there are also other types of RAM such as SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic RAM) and DDR (Double Data Rate) SDRAM which are faster than regular DRAM and cheaper than SRAM. SDRAM and DDR SDRAM can be good choices for systems that require fast access times and high data densities at a more affordable price.

Read more: Virtual Memory


In everyday use, the usage of SRAM and DRAM may not matter much to the end user, but the difference between the two can be seen in the performance of the system and the price of the product. For example, on a gaming computer that requires fast data access, using SRAM can significantly improve system performance. However, on laptops or mobile devices that require high data density at a more affordable price, using DRAM or SDRAM may be more appropriate.

In the tech industry, the development of RAM is continuing and there may be new types of RAM that are faster and cheaper in the future. However, the fundamental difference between SRAM and DRAM remains the basis for the development of new RAM technologies.

Examples of SRAM products:

Examples of DRAM products:


In conclusion, Static RAM and Dynamic RAM are two types of RAM that are commonly used in computer systems. SRAM uses flip-flops to store data and has a fast access time, but is more expensive and has a lower data density. DRAM uses capacitors to store data and has a higher data density for a more affordable price, but has a slower access time and must be refreshed regularly.

The choice between SRAM and DRAM depends on the specific requirements of the system. Apart from that, there are also other types of RAM such as SDRAM and DDR SDRAM which can be good choices for systems that require fast access times and high data density at a more affordable price.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top